Charlottesville shrouds divisive Confederate statues in black cloth

Charlottesville shrouds divisive Confederate statues in black clothTo applause from spectators, workers in Charlottesville, Virginia, covered two statues of Confederate generals with black tarpaulins on Wednesday in honor of the woman who was killed during a rally by white nationalists in the liberal-leaning college town. The council wants to remove the statues of Confederate Army generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, but cannot do because of a pending lawsuit challenging the city's plan. The Aug. 12 rally was organized by white nationalists who objected to the plans to remove the statues from a local park.



U.S. court throws out Texas voter I.D. law supported by Trump: filing

U.S. court throws out Texas voter I.D. law supported by Trump: filing(Reuters) - A U.S. court on Wednesday threw out a voter identification law that was supported by the Trump administration. The Texas attorney general, Ken Paxton, quickly issued a statement saying his office would appeal the federal court ruling. (Reporting by Bernie Woodall in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Editing by Toni Reinhold)



U.S. erred in declining protections for remote grizzly bears: judge

U.S. erred in declining protections for remote grizzly bears: judgeBy Laura Zuckerman SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - U.S. wildlife managers erred when they declined to list as endangered a small population of grizzly bears in the remote reaches of Idaho and northwest Montana, a federal judge has ruled in what conservationists on Wednesday hailed as a huge victory. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2014 determined the fewer than 50 grizzlies that roam the Cabinet Mountains and Yaak River drainage in the Northern Rockies were not in danger of extinction and did not warrant re-classifying as endangered or threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act.



Arizona ban on ethnic studies unconstitutional: U.S. judge

Arizona ban on ethnic studies unconstitutional: U.S. judgeThe decision by Judge A. Wallace Tashima issued on Tuesday came in response to a lawsuit by students and parents challenging the law, which ended a Mexican American Studies, or MAS, program run by the Tucson school district. "The Court is convinced that decisions regarding the MAS program were motivated by a desire to advance a political agenda by capitalizing on race-based fears," Tashima wrote in his ruling. Officials with the Arizona Department of Education were not immediately available for comment.



White House has prepared pardon documents for ex-Arizona sheriff Arpaio: CNN

White House has prepared pardon documents for ex-Arizona sheriff Arpaio: CNNThe White House has prepared paperwork for U.S. President Donald Trump to pardon Joe Arpaio, the controversial former Arizona sheriff convicted last month of criminal contempt in a racial profiling case, CNN reported on Wednesday. White House officials declined to comment, but an administration official told CNN that talking points to be used after Arpaio is pardoned also have been prepared. During an appearance on Tuesday in Phoenix, Trump hinted he would issue a pardon for Arpaio, who was the sheriff of Maricopa County, where Phoenix is located, for 24 years before losing a re-election bid last year.





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